The super-reality of superinjunctions 239


Enough speculation on the hazy grey, twilight world of superinjunctions. Here’s the reality.

We the people are being kept in the dark. Over the years, the high court has quietly been coming up with greater and greater reporting restrictions such that no-one dare even own up to their existence. But in the interests of free speech and at great personal risk I’ve decided to blow the whistle on the whole lot:-

Injunction: you can’t talk about something that happened

Superinjunction: you can’t talk about the person who did the thing that you can’t talk about

Superadjunction: you can’t talk about anything related to the person who did the thing you can’t talk about

Superconjunction: you can’t talk about anything else that may have happened to anyone else if it overlaps in any way with the person who did the thing you can’t talk about

Superconjection: you can’t speculate about the possibility that someone might have done something that you might not be able to talk about

Superconduction: you can’t pass through the same dimensional plane of existence as someone who might have done something that you might not be able to talk about

Superunction: you must fawn at the feet of the person you can’t talk about who did the thing you can’t talk about

Superflunktion: you must become a toadying, periwigged servant of the person you can’t talk about who did the thing you can’t talk about

Superumbunction: you must go to the sort of parties where feeding bottles, adult nappies and paddle-spankings are the norm in order to entertain the person you can’t talk about who did the thing that you can’t talk about, and thereby become part of something that is done by the person you can’t talk about when they do things you can’t talk about

Superupthejunction: you are so involved with the person you can’t talk about in doing the sorts of things you can’t talk about that it’s time to get your own superinjunction so that no-one else can talk about them either.

Hyperinjunction: you can’t reveal any of the above. Oops.


About robshepherd

My name's Rob Shepherd. By day I manage the press release agency Press Dispensary but this site isn't about that: this is my personal blog where I'm shoving into the ether a few general thoughts, much politics and the odd bit of creative or writing. Writing's important to me: my first play was a 15 minute comedy written when I was ten and which became our school's end-of-term play. My first short story - somewhat dystopian science fiction - was published when I was 14. Since then I've had a variety of careers in music, journalism, radio, film, TV, video and PR, with writing the common thread through all of them. Politics are equally important. I've been politically active since my teens, when I quickly negotiated a course of self-education from my parents' liberalism to the left of the Labour Party (while my parents negotiated themselves to the right of the Conservative Party and my dad became 3-times Tory Mayor of our home town). Like many of my generation, I left Labour at the rise of Noo Labour, the shift to the right and the utter abandonment of any principles in pursuit of power for its own sake. Then Iraq came and I was glad to be away from the immoral debacle of Blair's illegal war. I've lived in Brighton, England, since 1994, with a spell out in nearby Lewes, and I am presently chair of the Brighton & Hove Green Party.


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